Origins #62 - Founder's Newsletter

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Origins #62 - Founder's Newsletter

In this series we are documenting the journey of building DULO, starting from Day 1. Every week we publish a new chapter that takes you behind the scenes of our process. With every article we want to provide value to you, the reader. We share the success and failures, the opportunities and the challenges that we face while executing our vision.

If you are new, check out our previous post.


For this week's Origins, we wanted to share something different and show the type of emails we've been sending out over the past few weeks, taking turns with Marin and writing one every week.

We try to combine content that is interesting, useful, entertaining + anything else that we've been up to that might be worth mentioning.

To receive these emails straight in your inbox, just sign up for our newsletter.

Enjoy and let us know what you think of this format!

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Founder's Newsletter #5

By Julian

Well, hello there,

Before I start of this week's Founder Newsletter, an important announcement regarding the new GDPR policy that is now enforced in Europe.

If you wish to no longer receive any emails from us, feel free to unsubscribe from the list here
. You can also read our updated privacy policy here.

Having said that, we do hope you stay though 😊

Cool, now that we got the exciting stuff out of the way, let's get into this week's email with the overall theme of "storytelling".

There are two people, in my mind, that are absolutely killing the movie promotion game. The Rock for all his recent flicks and Ryan Reynolds and team for Deadpool 2.

Feel free to check their Instagram accounts for some of the actual posts, but here are my insights from those 2 case studies:

The importance of humor

Both of them leverage their charismatic personalities and translate that in either interviews or the copy of their social media posts, turning the message itself into entertainment, making it that much more powerful and efficient when it comes to leading people to their products.

The importance of collaborations

Ryan Reynolds made content with the following people (understand leveraging their audience) while promoting the movie: David BeckhamHugh Jackman, Celine Dion, Josh Brolin, Blake Lively. I am sure there are more that I haven't noticed.

The importance of understanding culture

Deadpool also made a conscious decision to attend smaller events where he could make a stronger connection with the fans there, instead of going to bigger audiences, e.g. 400 instead of 20 000. He understood the importance of depth vs width (building deeper relationships, instead of waving from a stage), and that on a macro the press that he'll get for being at a place he is not expected to be at, would end up getting him a bigger ROI when it comes to media coverage.

Another storytelling beast is Vince McMahon, Chairman of the WWE. For a while last week my YouTube recommended section became Stone Cold drinking beer, raising hell, stunning everything in sight and The Rock raising eyebrows. The narratives of those stories were so out there, delivered by men in tights, but still managed to captivate millions of people and make the stories seem somewhat serious and plausible.

A recommended listen would be this episode of the Steve Austin show with Vince McMahon. Not only would it give you an overview of the stories the WWE was telling in the Attitude Era, but it's an invaluable lesson in business and how the WWE became the monopoly in professional wrestling.

Here are my insights from the podcast:

- The WWF was competing with many similar organizations until they all burned out creatively and started declining in viewership. WWF had just a little more resources and stories to tell to keep people watching it until the rest of the competition declined and then WWF was able to buy them out. The main reason that the WWF was able to outlast and outcreate (might be another word I just made up) the competition was the fact that Vince reinvested all the earnings back into the business, whereas other owners were spending the cash for themselves.

The importance of understanding human behavior and psychology to weave a captivating storyline was key to creating the characters that would carry the show to the heights it reached during that era.

- The audience and their reactions played a huge part in giving directions to the stories and the way they were told. A proof that listening to your audience and their feedback and then taking those data points into the product development process is a huge factor in the success of any business.

On our end

The article on Hackernoon went live last week. It's a good summary of the journey so far, you can give it a read here, let us know what you think 👍

Thank you again for your time and attention 💜

See you in two weeks,

J.


Check our latest
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Help us in sharing the journey, it really means a lot. Forward to a friend
 


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Feature image by Denny Müller on Unsplash

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